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Single Edge Razor for Double Edge Blades

PatentUS1022623

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledWednesday, 29th July 1908

PublishedTuesday, 9th April 1912

InventorClifford E. Dunn

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

Clifford E. Dunn, of New York, N. Y. Safety-Razor
1,022,623. Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Apr. 9, 1912.
Application filed July 29, 1908. Serial No. 445,872

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Clifford E. Dunn, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city of New York, borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact specification.

My invention relates to improvements in safety razors and safety razor frames, the object being to provide a cheap, simple, and effective frame which can be easily constructed, and which will be simple in operation.

It is also the object of my invention to provide a frame wherein a double-edged blade can be used, each edge alternately, and wherein provision is made for protecting from injury the edge which is not being used.

Other objects of my invention will appear from the following description and accompanying drawings illustrating three forms thereof, wherein—

Figure 1 is a side elevation of one form of my razor; and Fig. 2 a front elevation thereof. Fig. 3 is a side sectional view of a slightly modified form. Fig. 4 is a top view of the construction of Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a sectional view of another modified form and Fig. 6 a rear view of the construction shown in Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a plan view of a double-edged blade.

Like reference numerals indicate corresponding parts in the different figures of the drawings.

The blade 1 is similar to the ordinary Gillette blade and is provided with two cutting edges 2 and 3, upon the longer sides. The frame illustrated is composed of a single piece of sheet spring metal bent as shown, and may be of brass, steel, or other suitable material. One end 4 of the sheet is designed to form the blade-support of the frame, and the intermediate section 5 is bent to form a handle, as shown. The other end 6 of the sheet is bent back over the top of the blade, and forms a cap or backing adapted to support the blade along its cutting edge when it is in position in the holder. Guard teeth 7 are formed in the forward portion of the blade-support 4, and lugs 8 are struck up from the outer ends of the guard teeth to form stops or lugs against which the forward end of the blade is adapted to contact. Snap hooks 9 are formed upon extensions at the outer ends of the cap section and are adapted to snap over the stops and securely hold the cap in place.

In the construction shown in Fig. 1, the blade 1 has but a single cutting edge, namely, the forward edge, and it is forced forward against the stops by the contact of its rear edge with the rear of the spring frame. To remove the blade the snap hooks are sprung away from the stops and the frame opened, when the removal can be easily accomplished.

In the construction shown in Fig. 3, a double-edged blade may be used, in which case it is provided with a central perforation 10. A spring finger 11 cut from the back of the frame, is adapted to enter said perforation 10, and to force the blade forward against the stops, and apertures or openings 12, 12, in the blade-support and backing are provided, within which the spring finger is adapted to have a limited movement. In this construction the edge of the blade which is not being used lies within the frame and is completely protected from injury or destruction,

In the construction shown in Figs. 5 and 6, a single-edged blade is used, and the spring finger 11 is adapted to bear against the rear of the blade.

In these constructions, whether a single or double-edged blade is used the cutting edge is always forced forward into operative position with respect to the guard and the proper cutting condition of the razor is always insured.

In the forms illustrated in these drawings, the blade is formed of a thin, flexible piece of steel, and the blade-support and cap are slightly curved. With this formation the blade can be clamped very firmly in place and the tension of the parts will maintain them rigidly in operative position. It is obvious, however, that the blade may be of sufficient thickness to be incapable of flexure, and in this case the blade-support and cap may be formed flat.

It is obvious that many other modifications and changes may be made, in my invention without departing from the spirit thereof, and I do not mean to limit myself to the particular form described, but

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A safety razor comprising a frame formed of a single piece of sheet metal, upon one end of which is formed a blade support and guard, blade-limiting stops adjacent to said guard, a handle formed from the middle of said piece of metal, a cap or backing formed from the other end of said piece of metal adapted to contact with the upper face of a blade on the support, and hooks formed on said cap adapted to engage the frame adjacent the guard to retain the backing in place.

2. A safety razor comprising a frame formed of a single piece of sheet metal, upon one end of which is formed a blade-support and guard, blade-limiting stops adjacent to said guard, a handle formed from the middle of said piece of metal, a spring tongue formed from said metal piece adapted to coöperate with a blade on the support and force the same against the stops, a cap or backing formed from the other end of said metal piece adapted to contact with the upper face of the blade, and hooks formed on said cap adapted to engage the frame adjacent the guard to retain the backing in place.

3. A safety razor comprising a frame formed of a single piece of sheet metal, upon one end of which is formed a blade-support and guard, blade limiting stops adjacent to said guard, a handle formed from the middle of said piece of metal, a blade, a cap or backing formed from the other end of said piece of metal adapted to contact with the upper face of the blade, and hooks formed on said cap adapted to engage the frame adjacent the guard to retain the backing in place.

4. A safety razor comprising a frame formed of a single piece of sheet metal, upon one end of which is formed a blade-support and guard, blade limiting stops adjacent to said guard, a handle formed from the middle, of said piece of metal, a blade, a spring tongue formed from said metal piece adapted to coöperate with the blade and force the same against the stops, a cap or backing formed from the other end of said metal piece adapted to contact with the upper face of the blade, and hooks, formed on said cap adapted to engage the frame adjacent the guard to retain the backing in place.

5. A safety razor frame formed from a single piece of sheet steel, comprising a blade-support, a guard, a handle, stops at the ends of said guard, a cap or backing adapted to contact with the upper face of the blade, spring hooks located at the outer ends of said backing and adapted to fit over the stops, the parts being so arranged that the blade is clamped firmly between the blade-support and backing, which latter supports and gives rigidity to its cutting edge, and a spring tongue adapted to coöperate with the blade to force it forward against the stops.

6. A safety razor frame formed from a single piece of sheet steel, comprising a blade-support, a guard, a handle, stops at the ends of said guard, a cap or backing adapted to contact with the upper face of the blade, spring hooks located at the outer ends of said backing and adapted to fit over the stops, a spring tongue adapted to coöperate with and force the blade forward against the lugs, registering apertures in the blade-support and cap within which the spring tongue is permitted to have a limited movement, the parts being so arranged that the blade is clamped firmly between the blade-support and backing, which latter supports and gives rigidity to its cutting edge.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

Clifford E. Dunn.

Witnesses:

Charles A. Scheuber,

Adolph F. Diuse.