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SE Razor '1914'

PatentUS1091436

InventionRazor

FiledWednesday, 12th February 1913

PublishedTuesday, 24th March 1914

InventorJoseph Kaufman

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

Joseph Kaufman, of New York, N.Y. Razor
1,091,436, Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Mar.24,1914.
Application filed February 12, 1913.Serial No. 747,968.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known, that I, Joseph Kaufman, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Razors; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to improvements in razors, and more particularly to the type known as safety razors.

The object in view is the improvement of a razor frame for increasing the efficiency, compactness, accessibility and finish, while embodying these features in a construction capable of production at a minimum expense.

A further object in detail is the provision of especially effective means for retaining a razor blade against dislocation during use.

With these and further objects in view, which will in part hereinafter be stated, and in part become apparent, the invention comprises certain novel combinations, constructions and arrangements of parts as will be specified and claimed.

In the accompanying drawing,—Figure 1 is an edge view of a razor embodying the features of the invention, the hood being seen in its closed position. Fig. 2 is a top plan view thereof with the hood in its open position. Fig. 3 is a vertical, central section taken on the plane indicated by line 3—3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a similar section with the hood illustrated in its closed position. Fig. 5 is a detail, perspective view of the rear springs detached and shown on a greatly enlarged scale. Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken on the plane indicated by line 6—6 of Fig. 2.

Referring to the drawing by numerals, 1 indicates a handle of any well known or conventional type having its upper end threaded into the back plate 2 of a razor frame, the said plate curving upwardly from the handle and being bent forwardly to complete the frame in producing the blade supporting plate 3. The plate 3 terminates along its front edge in the usual safety guard 4, at each end of which is arranged an upstanding lug or detent 5 adapted to serve as a stop against forward movement of a razor blade, indicated at 6, the blade being further retained in position by guiding brackets 7, 7, comprising tabs or strips formed of the material of plate 3, at the ends thereof and intermediate the edges of the blade, and bent back over the plate for overlapping the blade. The material of plate 3 is out away at its rear edge, approximately midway between its ends, and the back 2 has its material cut away at substantially the same place for forming an opening 8 for accommodating a plate spring 9 and coöperating parts. The spring 9 is preferably bifurcated at its lower portion and the arms of the bifurcation are riveted, as at 10, or otherwise fixed to the back 2, the spring 9 extending upwardly from said arms into position for swinging into and across parts of the opening 8.

As indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 2, the back 2 is of less width than the length of plate 3, so that portions of the plate 3 outstand from each edge of back 2, and a strip of the material of the razor frame projects rearwardly at each end of the rear edge of plate 3, each of said strips being bent to form an eye 12. A hood 13 is disposed to coöperate with the razor frame and consists of a main or cover plate 14 having pendent end flanges 15, 15, and a pendent rear flange 16, the latter preferably being comprised of a downwardly curved portion of the material of plate 14. The side flanges 15 may be similarly formed, or otherwise constructed as preferred. The plate 14 is disposed with respect to its flanges to extend downwardly forwardly, preferably on a curved line, so as to have its forward edge lie flush with the lower edge of the end flanges. Thus the hood structure 13 is formed or shaped to present a substantially concavo-convex body. The rear flange 16 extends below the lower edge of the end flanges 15 and such extended portion is notched longitudinally at each end, as indicated at 17, producing a longitudinally extending pintle 18 at each end of the hood, the said pintles extending through and finding bearings in the eyes 12. Substantially midway of the length of the flange 16, the material of the flange is extended downwardly to produce a tab or tongue 19 which extends forwardly a distance sufficient for engaging and coöperating with the upper, free end portion of spring 9 so as to cause the spring to move forwardly during either opening or closing movement of the hood, the end of the tongue 19 engaging the rear face of the spring 9 and riding past the same in an opening movement and into a firm engagement therewith in a closing movement, the former position being indicated in Fig. 3, and the latter in Fig. 4.

To insure maintenance of the blade 6 taut in its operative position, and also to position the blade with its front edge in engagement with the detents during assembling of the parts when the operator has not been careful in positioning the blade, as for instance when the blade is left a little in the rear of its operative position, a spring is disposed in the rear portion of the hood 13 for engaging the rear edge or back of the blade. The said spring preferably in fact consists of a pair of coöperating spring 20 and 21, each having its rear end flattened to fit against the respective portion of the wall of flange 16, and each flattened portion being apertured, as at 22, for receiving a rivet or other securing means engaging the flange 16, the material of the spring throughout the said flattened portion being formed with a forwardly turned flange 23 bearing against and conforming in contour with the material of plate 14. The springs 20 and 21 are bent or otherwise directed forwardly on an incline, and are extended for having their free ends lapping and spaced forwardly from the flange 16. The said free ends preferably have a sliding engagement, one of the springs being formed with a longitudinal slot 24, and the other with a tongue 25, extending through the slot, the tongue terminating in an enlargement or head 26 beyond the slot for lockin the two springs together but leaving them free for relative longitudinal movement. It is obvious, of course, that as a matter of assemblage, the slot 24 is of sufficient length for permitting the edgewise passage of the head 26, the latter being of flat material the same as the material of the spring from which it is formed. After the interlocking of the springs by the introduction of the head through the slot, the springs are swung to a position of alinement, as seen in Fig. 5, and are then ready to be secured by being riveted through apertures 26, or otherwise fixed to the flange 16.

It will be observed that in operation the hood 13 is free to swing to an open position outstanding rearwardly from the razor frame so as to afford maximum freedom of access, and to enable easy withdrawal and replacement of the blade. It will also be observed that in applying the blade it is only necessary to pass the forward edge of the same beneath the retaining brackets 7 and forwardly into contact with the lugs 5, and then to snap the hood 13 closed. If by any chance the blade has not been brought entirely to its operative position, the back of the blade will be engaged by the free end of the spring 20 and pressed forwardly to the final position, the hood closing and being retained closed under the spring pressure of spring 9 engaged by tongue 19. It is to be noted that the tongue 19 extends beyond the axis of the alined pintles 18, and therefore whenever the tongue is below the plane of that axis and in engagement with spring 9, the hood will be pressed toward the closed position, and whenever the tongue is above the plane of the said axis and in engagement with the spring 9, the hood will be pressed rearwardly or toward the open position.

All reference to the disposition of parts, as upwardly or forwardly or the like, throughout this specification contemplates a disposition of the razor with the handle arranged vertically, as when shaving, and the guard edge is considered the front edge. It is also obvious, of course, that the drawings are all on an enlarged scale, greater than the actual size of the usual razor structure.

What I claim is:—

1. In a razor, the combination, with a frame and a hood therefor, of springs fixed to the hood at spaced points and having free portions lapping, and means connecting the free lapping portions for preventing lateral separation thereof, and allowing coöperative spring action of the free portions of the springs.

2. In a razor, the combination with a frame having eyes outstanding rearwardly therefrom, of a hood comprising a top or cover plate, a rear edge flange extending downwardly from the cover plate, the end portions of the flange being formed with pintles journaled in said eyes in position for adapting the hood to swing pivotally from a position substantially above the frame to a position outstanding rearwardly therefrom, and end flanges pendent from the cover plate and tapering to the front edge of said plate, the plate being inclined forwardly sufficiently for causing its forward edge to lie substantially in the same plane with the lower edges of the end flanges.

3. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of lapping, plate springs carried by the hood, each spring having one end fixed to the hood and the other end free for spring movement, the free end of one spring lapping the free end of the other, and the springs being disposed for having their free end portions exert pressure on a blade sustained by the frame.

4. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of springs extending longitudinally of the hood at the rear portion thereof, one end of one spring being fixed to the hood adjacent one end thereof, and one end of the other spring being fixed to the hood adjacent the other end thereof, the said springs being extended forwardly from the points of engagement with the hood and adapted for exerting forward pressure against a blade sustained by the frame.

5. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of springs extending longitudinally of the hood, one of the springs having one of its ends fixed to the hood adjacent one end thereof, and the other spring having one of its ends fixed to the hood adjacent the other end thereof, said springs being extended forwardly from the points of engagement with the hood and having their free ends lapping and disposed for exerting pressure against a blade sustained by the frame.

6. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of plate springs fixed to the hood and having free end portions lapping and having a longitudinally shiftable engagement, the said springs being disposed for having their lapping portions exert pressure against a blade sustained by the frame.

7. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of plate springs fixed to the hood and having lapping free end portions, one of the springs being formed with a longitudinal slot, and the other with an extension projecting through the slot, the springs being disposed for having their free end portions exert pressure on a blade sustained by the frame.

8. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor, of springs fixed to the hood and having lapping free end portions, one of the springs being formed with a slot and the other with an extension projecting through the slot and an enlargement carried by the projection beyond the slot, the springs being adapted to exert pressure on a blade sustained by the frame.

9. In a razor, the combination with a frame and a hood therefor having a flange, of a pair of springs, each of said springs having one end portion fixed to the flange of the hood and having a flange extending from the fixed portion along the adjacent portion of the hood, the springs being disposed to exert pressure against a blade sustained by the frame.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two Witnesses.

Joseph Kaufman.

Witnesses:

Julius B. de Mesqueba,

B. Kline.