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Geneva SENCA Safety Razor

PatentUS1356240

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledMonday, 24th March 1919

PublishedTuesday, 19th October 1920

InventorPhilip H. Unsinger

OwnerGeneva Cutlery Corporation

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

Philip H. Unsinger, of Geneva, New York, assignor to Geneva Cutlery Corporation, of Geneva, New York, a corporation of New York. Safety-Razor
1,356,240. Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Oct. 19, 1920.
Application filed March 24, 1919. Serial No. 284,749

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Philip H. Unsinger, a citizen of the United States of America, and resident of Geneva, in the county of Ontario, in the State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to certain improvements in safety razors.

An object of the invention is to produce a safety razor of relatively simple construction and mechanical operation in which there is practically no danger of the user cutting himself in assembling or disassembling the parts.

Another object relates to the efficient and positive nature of the holding or locking means for securing the parts in position for use.

A further object relates to the production of a combined plain and toothed guard in which the plain guard or guard bar is positioned in advance of the teeth and from which the teeth project somewhat upwardly and rearwardly toward the blade to have a smoothing rather than a digging effect. The teeth terminate beneath the blade and are of such a length as to insure freedom of the beard from being forced against the face both before and during cutting. The guard bar preceding the guard teeth avoids sharp corners coming in contact with the face and wipes at least a portion of the lather from the face.

A further advantage resides in the ease and rapidity with which the parts may be assembled for use and disassembled as for cleaning or packing or other purposes.

The other objects and advantages relate to the details of construction as will more fully appear from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which :—

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the safety razor taken from the rear.

Fig. 2 is a section on line 2—2, Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a section on line 3—3, Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4—4, Fig. 2.

The razor as shown comprises a base plate —1— preferably formed of sheet metal having its front portion bent downwardly from the body of the plate and preferably lying at an obtuse angle with the body of the plate to constitute when formed as hereinafter described a guard bar and a series of upwardly and rearwardly extending guard teeth. For this purpose the plate has a portion cut away to form an elongated opening —2— bordered by relatively narrow side walls —3— and a narrow integral bar —4— constituting the guard bar of the razor. A series of guard teeth —5— project into the opening —2— and when the front portion of the plate —1— is bent downwardly about an axes extending through the intermediate portions of the side walls —3— these teeth extend preferably forwardly and rearwardly toward a blade —6— when properly seated upon the base —1—. The opening —2— extends some distance to the rear of the front edge of blade —6— and as stated the teeth —5— terminate beneath the blade leaving a free passage beneath the blade for lather, hair, etc., the front edge of the blade at the side portions being supported by side walls —3— and preferably these walls are provided with stops —7— to properly limit and position the blade. These stops —7— may be formed in any suitable manner as by punching up parts of the plate —1— or otherwise. The blade —6— is held in place upon the base —1— by a clamping member —8— connected to the base for pivotal or rocking movement to permit separation of the parts to an extent allowing removal of the blade and permit the easy cleaning of the structure. For this purpose the clamping plate is formed with a substantially flat body portion —9— and opposite end parts —10— bent at substantially right angles to the portion —9— and having their rear portions formed with apertures or openings —11— for the reception of pintles —12— formed upon opposite edges of the base —1—. The end parts —10— may preferably be shaped as shown, the rear part being substantially circular in form and the remaining portion of said part tapering forwardly and adapted to lie outside of the opposite edges of base —1— to inclose the blade except as to its projecting front edge portion. The rear portion —13— of the clamping member —8— is preferably bent in substantially arcuate form to conform to the shape of the rear portion of parts —10— and forms a receptacle adapted to receive and hold the blade when the clamping member is rocked about the plate —1— to its bent position. For the purpose of locking or holding the clamping member in proper position relative to the base —1— to tightly grip the blade and hold it rigidly in position for use the rear portion —13— is provided with a central flange —14— which may preferably be a symmetrical condition of the said arcuate portion and extends toward the rear face of the base —1— and the base is provided with a cut out portion —15— forming a recess through which the flange —14— moves when the clamping member is rocked about the base —1—.

It will be understood that by exerting pressure on flange —14— to force it rearwardly away from the base —1— the clamping member —8— will be rocked about the base —1— until its front edge tightly grips the blade —6— interposed between the clamping plate and the base and as this member is formed of sheet metal of a more or less resilient nature the blade will be tightly and rigidly gripped with a spring tension thus permitting slight variation in the size and relation of the parts without affecting their efficient operation. For accomplishing this purpose in a preferred manner the handle —16— maybe secured to the base —1— for rotary movement about an axis substantially perpendicular to the base and this may be accomplished by forming the handle with a somewhat enlarged head —17— having a recess —18— for engagement with screw —19— extending through the base —1— and preferably having its head countersunk therein and constituting such axis. The head —17— is provided with a projecting lug —20— or member which may as shown be tapered longitudinally and laterally and so positioned that upon rotary movement of the handle —16— this lug is forced beneath the flange —14— to press the same rearwardly and effect the operation heretofore described. The lug —20— may be of somewhat angular or inverted V-shape and the flange —14— may be provided with a small recess adapted to engage the peak of the lug when the parts are properly positioned to frictionally rock the same.

The handle —16— may if desired be formed in sections in the usual manner and may be shaped in desired form to effect the most efficient operation of the blade —6— when positioned between the base and the clamping member.

Although I have shown and described a specific construction, form and relation of the parts as illustrative of a perhaps preferred embodiment of my invention, I do not desire to limit myself to the same as various changes, modifications and substitutions may be made in the detail of construction, form, arrangement and operation without departing from the invention as stated herewith in the appended claims.

What I claim is:—

1. A razor comprising a base, a clamping member pivoted to the base and embodying a flange extending from the rear of the fulcrum to a position at the opposite side of the base and in front of the said fulcrum and a member movably mounted on the base and engaging the said flange in front of the said fulcrum and acting to hold the clamping member in blade gripping position.

2. A razor comprising a base, a clamping member pivoted to the rear portion of the base and embodying a flange extending from the rear of the fulcrum to a position at the opposite side of the base and in front of the said fulcrum, a member movably mounted on the base and engaging the said flange in front of the said fulcrum and interlocking parts on the said member and flange.

3. A razor comprising a base, a clamping member pivoted to the base and embodying a flange extending from the rear of the fulcrum to a position at the opposite side of the base and in front of the said fulcrum, a member movably mounted on the base and engaging the said flange in front of the said fulcrum and acting to hold the clamping member in blade gripping position and a handle secured to the base and actuating the said member.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 17th day of March, 1919.

Philip H. Unsinger.

Witnesses:

Walter Althoff,

W. W. Pace.