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Folding Cardboard Razor

PatentUS1875990

InventionSafety Razor

FiledTuesday, 15th September 1931

PublishedTuesday, 6th September 1932

InventorBurton Christmas

LanguageEnglish

A novelty razor that is folded into what looks like book of matches.

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

Patented Sept. 6, 1932. 1,875,990
United States Patent Office.

Burton Christmas, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Safety Razor Application filed September 15, 1931.Serial No. 562,850.

This invention relates to safety razors and is herein disclosed as embodied in a razor adapted to be cheaply manufactured and also adapted to carry advertisements, so that it may be sold at a nominal price or may be given away.

As herein illustrated the razor blade lies in a pocket or enclosure formed by folding a sheet, and the other end of the sheet forms a cover or flap which may serve as a handle adapted to be folded into about the same space as an ordinary card of cardboard matches. In the form herein illustrated the cover or flap folds down over the exposed edge of the blade, but is adapted to be unfolded so as to form an extension of the handle, and when thus unfolded may be bent lengthwise so as to provide a continuous stiff handle including the extension.

The structure which carries the blade of the razor may be made of a sheet of paraffined or otherwise waterproofed flexible material such as cardboard of suitable stiffness. When the body is made of cardboard or other similarly workable material the whole structure may be bound together by one or more staples, like the ordinary binding staples used for binding papers together. This provides a cheap and efficient method of binding the blade, in the pocket and to the guard and to the body of the cover.

In this form of device the cardboard handle and flap provide a suitable and effective surface upon which to print advertising matter, both on the inside and outside surfaces.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawing:

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing the razor folded.

Figure 2 shows the razor opened.

Figure 3 is an enlarged side view of the folded razor.

Figure 4 is a side view of the razor showing the parts in the position they assume when grasped by the hand.

Figure 5 is a perspective view showing the razor grasped by the hand for use.

The razor illustrated includes a thin blade 10 of any suitable usual or desired type, such as a flexible wafer blade. As herein illustrated the mounting for the blade is a waterproofed cardboard.

To provide this mounting there is shown a sheet of cardboard 11 bent at 12 so as to provide a face 13 and back 14 on opposite faces of the blade 10. In the form illustrated a guard 15 lies between the back 14 and blade 10, and is spaced from the blade by a spacer 16 to provide a desired free cutting edge 17.

It has been found satisfactory to use for the back 14 of the sheet 11 a sheet the size of the back of a usual cardboard card of matches and provide a front extension 13 between half and two thirds the depth of the blade 10.

It is preferable to use a blade 10 provided with perforations (such as are shown at 18) so that an ordinary wire binding staple 18 may pass through the front 13, where it covers the blade openings (not seen), and through the spacer 16 and guard 15 and back 14, thus enabling a single staple to bind all the parts together. Thus the free ends of the staple lie against the back 14 and cannot touch the face which is being shaved. It is found that a staple having a spread of ¾ inch satisfactorily binds the parts together.

When it is desired to use the razor the extension 20 of the back is straightened out as in Figure 2 and then is folded back along a central longitudinal crease 21, as seen in Figures 4 and 5, said crease splitting at 22 into two diagonal creases which are shown as running from a point clear of the guard 15 down to the edge of the back 14, ending opposite the staple 19, or even near the fold 12, at 23.

The thumb of the shaver then will rest in one bend 24 which springs from the point 22, and the forefinger of the shaver lie in the other bend 25. It is found that this structure provides a comfortable and firm hold on the razor, the folded end 26 of the extension 20 resting comfortably in the palm of the hand.

When the razor is carried, for example in a vest pocket, the end 20 may be bent over at 27 about as is customary in cardboard match cards, and its tip 26 may be tucked into the opening 28 between the free end of the face 13 beyond the staple 19 and the blade 10.

It has been found possible to make a satisfactory guard 15, with teeth 29 of about the usual shape, of water-proofed cardboard.

It will be noted that the outer surface of the sheet 11 provides an excellent surface on which to print or otherwise display advertising, and that the razor may be made cheaply enough to warrent discarding after being used once or possibly twice.

Having thus described one embodiment of the invention, what is claimed is:

1. A safety razor including a blade having a cutting edge, a sheet of flexible material folded at one end to pass around the blade and terminate near the cutting edge and extended at the other end to form a handle, a further extension of the material forming a flap folding at will down over the blade to cover the cutting edge, and a crease in the extension so that the extension will fold along the crease to form a reasonably stiff handle.

2. A safety razor including a blade, a sheet of cardboard passing around the blade so that one end terminates at the cutting edge, an extension of the opposite end of the cardboard forming a handle, a cardboard guard for the blade, a binding device passing through the guard and sheet and blade, and a crease in the cardboard handle so as to serve as a guide in bending it and serving to stiffen it.

3. A safety razor including a blade, a sheet of card board passing around the blade so that one end terminates at the cutting edge, a cardboard guard for the blade, a staple passing through the sheet and guard and blade to bend them together, an extension of the opposite end of the sheet forming a handle, a further extension of the sheet normally folded down over the blade, and a crease running through the whole of the extension longitudinally so they bend to form a single stiff handle forming a longitudinal rest for two fingers.

4. A safety razor including a blade having an opening, a sheet of cardboard passing around the blade so that one end terminates at the cutting edge, a cardboard guard for the blade, a binding staple passed through the sheet in front of and behind the blade and the guard and through the opening in the blade to bind them together, an extension of the opposite end of the sheet having a crease running longitudinally from near the blade so that the extension may fold into a stiff handle, and a further extension beyond the first extension normally folded down over it and also provided with a crease so that the whole extension forms a continuous handle when opened out and folded along the crease.

5. A safety razor including a sheet of cardboard folded at one end to form an enclosure for a blade so that the end terminates at the cutting edge of the blade, a guard in the enclosure, an extension at the other end of the sheet normally folded down over the open end of the enclosure and a lengthwise crease in the sheet and extension upon which they may be folded to form a continuous stiff handle.

6. A safety razor including a blade having a cutting edge, a sheet of cardboard passing around the blade so that one end lies along its cutting edge, an extension of the other end of the sheet normally folded to cover the blade but otherwise foldable to form a relatively stiff extended handle, a guard between the blade and the edge of the sheet near the blade edge, and a spacer between the guard and the blade.

7. A safety razor including a blade having a cutting edge, a sheet of cardboard on which the blade is mounted so that one end of the cardboard lies along the cutting edge, the cardboard being folded around the other edge of the blade and extending up past the cutting edge to form a handle, and having the opposite end adapted to be extended as such handle or folded back and caught in front of the cutting edge so as to serve as a cover for the cutting edge.

8. A safety razor including a cardboard mount folded to form a pocket at one end, a blade having a cutting edge along the end of the pocket, the opposite end of the cardboard being adapted to form a handle when extended, being adapted to be folded down at a central transverse crease to serve as a protecting cover for the cutting edge, and also provided with a longitudinal crease adapted to guide a fold to give the handle stiffness, said longitudinal crease splitting into two diagonal creases adjacent the blade, each diagonal crease running toward the adjacent end of the blade.

9. A safety razor including a cardboard mount folded to form a pocket at one end, a blade having a cutting edge along the end of the pocket, the opposite end of the cardboard being adapted to form a handle when extended, being adapted to be folded down at a central transverse crease to serve as a protecting cover for the cutting edge, and also provided with a longitudinal crease adapted to guide a fold to give the handle stiffness, said longitudinal crease splitting into two diagonal creases adjacent the blade, each diagonal crease running toward the adjacent end of the blade and a guard between the cardboard and the blade having teeth to lie near the cutting edge to guard it.

10. A safety razor including a cardboard mount folded to form a pocket at one end, a blade having a cutting edge along the end of the pocket, the opposite end of the cardboard being adapted to form a handle when extended, being adapted, to be folded down at a central transverse crease to serve as a protecting cover for the cutting edge, and also provided with a longitudinal crease adapted to guide a fold to give the handle stiffness, said longitudinal crease splitting into two diagonal creases adjacent the blade, each diagonal crease running toward the adjacent end of the blade and a guard between the cardboard and the blade having teeth to lie near the cutting edge to guard it, a space between the guard and blade, and a bending staple passing through the cardboard and guard and spacer and blade to bind the blade and adjacent parts together.

Burton Christmas.