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parts c Fig1 Fig1 c b b e e f a Fig2 Fig2 d b c f e a Fig3 Fig3 d b b c e e f a Fig4 Fig4 d b b c f e a Fig5 Fig5 a a b d e e' Fig6 Fig6 d a a e d c c b Fig7 Fig7 e d b b d Fig8 Fig8

Monks' Shaving Apparatus

PatentUS206473

InventionImprovement in Shaving Apparatus

FiledMonday, 3rd December 1877

PublishedTuesday, 30th July 1878

InventorJohn Monks

LanguageEnglish

This razor was orininally patented in England in 1874. Affecitionately known as the “pig-scraper” because it is “intended for shaving the beard, but it may be employed for trimming the hair, or removing the same from the skin of any animal”.

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

John Monks, of Gloucester, England. iImprovement in Shaving Apparatus
Specification forming part of Letters Patent No. 206,473, dated July 30, 1878; application filed December 3, 1877; patented in England, November 6, 1874, and April 26, 1875.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, John Monks, of the city and county of Gloucester, England, have invented an Improvement in Shaving Apparatus, of which the following is a specification:

This apparatus is intended for shaving the beard, but it may be employed for trimming the hair, or removing the same from the skin of any animal.

I make use of a blade that is clamped and held in a frame, in combination with a guard-plate that is provided with interstices, and is adjustable relatively to the blade, and provided with a plate at right angles, or nearly so, to the blade to form a handle.

In the drawings, Figure 1 represents the cutting-blade. Fig. 2 is a plan of the apparatus complete. Fig. 3 is a vertical longitudinal section. Fig. 4 is a perspective view at one side of the apparatus. Fig. 5 is similar view of the other side. Fig. 6 is a cross-section of the apparatus in a slightly-modified form. Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the same, and Fig. 8 is a front view thereof.

a is the main portion of the apparatus, forming a frame or handle, by which the instrument is grasped when in use. The cutting-blade c is received within the flanges or holders b, that are at right angles, or nearly so, to the plate a. The blade is held in position by the spring d, Fig. 5, or by the clamping-screw e′, Fig. 6. The lips e, that are upon the plate a, are turned over to hold the interstitial guard-plate f, that has openings adjacent to the blade c. The interstitial guard-plate is moved up to the side of the blade, in the form shown in Figs. 3 and 4, or the blade is pressed against the interstitial guard-plate, in the form shown in Fig. 7. In this last figure the interstitial guard-plate is made a part of the plate a.

It is to be understood that the plate a forms a handle, by which the instrument is held while in use, and that the blade is to occupy the same position to the beard that an ordinary razor does when in use; but the guard-plate serves asa gage, that slides over the surface and lessens the risk of injury to the person when in use.

The blade is to be removed to any suitable holder while being sharpened or strapped.

I claim as my invention—

In combination with a cutting-blade, clamped and held in a suitable frame, a guard-plate provided with interstices adjustable relatively to the blade, and having the plate a, that extends at right angles, or nearly so, to the blade and forms a handle, substantially as set forth.

John Monks.

Witnesses:

Chas. Fr. Gale,

Notary Public, Cheltenham.

W. W. Davis,

Solicitor's Clerk, Cheltenham.