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Fasan Slant — US patent

PatentUS2129022

InventionDouble Edged Safety Razor

FiledTuesday, 28th August 1934

PublishedTuesday, 6th September 1938

InventorWalter Osberghaus

LanguageEnglish

Other countriesCH180747, DE665265, NL38565

For a full resolution version of the images click here

A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

Remark: A very sloppy patent. Two parts (the cap and the stem) are designated by the letter c. The cap is also referred to as part e in the text. Also, the blade pins are labelled d in the drawings and 7 in the text. I have tried to make the references consistent.
Patented Sep. 6, 1938 2,129,022
United States Patent Office
2,129,022 DOUBLE EDGED SAFETY RAZOR. Walter Osberghaus, Solingen, Germany Application August 28, 1934, Serial No. 741,835
In Germany April 6, 1933
1 Claim. (Cl. 30—49)

This invention relates to a safety razor with a blade clamped, between a guard and a cap, and its object is to provide a razor whose blade is presented to the skin in the most favorable position.

To this end the cap is made with wedge-shaped sides, the ridge of each wedge being defined by a line extending from the top at one end of the cap to its base at the other end, and the upper ends of the two wedges i. e. their intersections with the flat top of the cap being defined by a pair of parallel lines extending from opposite ends of the top of the cap at an angle to its sides.

It is known that the blade will cut better if it is guided over the surfaces to be shaved in a position inclined at an angle to the direction of cut, as in this instance the edge of the blade exerts a drawing cut.

By the wedge-shaped edges of the cap the user is compelled to hold and guide the razor in the correct position. The user is accustomed to hold the razor, when in use, so that he can feel the longitudinal edges of guard and cap bearing against his skin, the corresponding cutting edge coming thereby into a definite position which is parallel to the bearing lines of the guard and cap in the known razors. However, the bearing lines of guard plate and cap, i. e. the intersection of the corresponding wedge with the top of the cap, according to the invention are not parallel but at an angle to each other so that, when the user has brought the razor into contact with his skin in the usual way, the blade edge is inclined at an angle in the space between the two bearing lines and, when the razor is pulled over the skin in the usual manner, it operates with the desired drawing out.

Fig. 1 is an end elevation,

Fig. 2 is a side elevation, and

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the razor.

Figs. 4 and 5 are sections on the lines 4—4- and 5—5 respectively in Fig. 2, viewed as indicated by the arrows.

Fig. 6 is a perspective illustration of the cap, and

Fig. 7 is a perspective illustration of the guard.

Fig. 8 is a diagram showing the position of a cutting edge with respect to the direction in which the razor is moved over the skin.

Figs. 9 and 10 are diagrams showing respectively the parallel position of the bearing lines of the guard, the cap and the corresponding cutting edge, in the known razors, and by way of comparison, the angular position of the bearing line on the cap.

The guard of the razor is designated by a, the blade by b and the cap by c.

The guard a is slightly twisted, i. e. the ends of its teeth on both sides are arranged on lines which are at an angle to each other, as best seen in Fig. 1.

The cap e is equipped with the usual central threaded stem c at its centre; and the usual pins 7 to enter openings in the blade b and the guard a. g is the usual handle which is placed on the stem c.

Referring now to Fig. 2, the side of the cap e which is visible in this figure i. e. the side at the right in Fig. 1, is wedge-shaped. The line f—f which extends from the top of the side at one end to its base at the other end, is the ridge of the wedge and, at the same, the hypothenuses of two triangular surfaces. The triangle f—f, , f—f′, f′—f is vertical and the triangle f—f, f—f″, f″—f is inclined. The opposite side, with the hypothenuses h—h, is quite similar and need not be described, the only distinction being that its wedge is symmetrical to the wedge with the ridge f—f, so that the upper ends of the two wedges, i. e. their intersections with the flat top of the cap e, are the two parallel lines f—f″ and h—h″, Fig. 3, which extend from opposite ends of the cap's top at an angle to its sides, i. e. to the vertical projections of the lines f—f and h—h on the base of the cap.

When bringing the razor into position for use, the user causes the cap c to bear against the skin with one of its bearing lines or intersections f—f″ or h—h″ as shown in Fig. 4 where the dotted lines s indicate the skin, and he then turns the razor about this bearing line until he can feel the guard a touching his skin, whereupon he pulls the razor over the skin, as indicated by the arrows in Figs 8 and 10. The active cutting edge of blade b on account of its angular position to the bearing line f—f″ or h—h″, performs a drawing cut.

I claim:—

A safety razor comprising a cap, a guard, and means for clamping a blade between the cap and the guard, the cap having wedge-shaped sides, the ridge of each wedge being defined by a line extending from the top at one end of the cap to its base at the other end, and the upper ends of the two wedges being defined by a pair of parallel lines extending from opposite ends of the top of the cap at an angle to its sides.

WALTER OSBERGHAUS.