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parts 17a 24 15 16 29 28 12 21 19 22 23 10 11 21 12 17 3-3 3-3 3-3 Fig1 Fig1 29 28 20 B A 27 26 15 24 31 17a 22 23 10 16 17 20 14 18 28 32 30 Fig2 Fig2 33a 16 18 19 17a 24 15 25 34 27 13 33 29 12 28 14 23 20 22 26 10 11 5-5 5-5 5-5 Fig3 Fig3 33a 17a 24 16 18 28 22 20 23 10 14 12 27 29 33 19 34 25 15 26 Fig4 Fig4 29 35 34 27 13 33 17a 24 25 16 26 12 31 17 30 32 Fig5 Fig5

Injector Razor

PatentUS2221379

InventionRazor

FiledThursday, 28th July 1938

PublishedTuesday, 12th November 1940

InventorsJohn H. Hilliard, Leopold Karl Kuhnl

OwnerMagazine Repeating Razor Company

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

Patented Nov. 12, 1940 2,221,379
United States Patent Office
2,221,379 Razor John H. Hilliard, New York, N. Y., and Leopold Kuhnl, Bridgeport, Conn., assignors to Magazine Repeating Razor Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application July 28, 1938. Serial No. 221,658. 5 Claims. (Cl. 30—40)

The invention relates to a razor of the type characterized generally by the fact that renewal of worn blades is effected by means of a magazine injector, such as is illustrated and described in United States Patent to Rodrigues No. 2,109,017. The razor in connection with which such an injector is used must be strong and durable, certain in its action, readily cleanable, and easy of manipulation. It is especially desirable that the blade, when set in shaving position, shall present a firm and unyielding edge, and furthermore that it shall be tightly clamped. The object of the invention is to secure these advantages to as great an extent as possible.

Referring to the drawing,

Fig. 1 is a front view in elevation of the razor head embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig.1 but showing the guard dropped to exposed the blade edge for cleaning and with the magazine finger inserted to its full length;

Fig. 3 is a view on the line 3—3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but showing the slide for operating the blade holder withdrawn; and

Fig. 5 is a plan section on line 5—5 of Fig. 3 showing, in addition, the aligning finger of the magazine partially inserted preparatory to the ejection of a worn blade and the introduction of a new one.

The drawing shows my preferred embodiment of the invention. Referring more particularly to it, a shank 10 projects from a conventional handle 11 and is widened out as shown at 12. The widened portion is formed as a channel section comprising the back plate 13 and the two flanges 14 and 15, the flange 15 serving as a clamping plate to confine the blade carrier, as will be presently explained. The guard 16 carrying the blade stops 17 and 17a is formed by bending the under-plate 18, which in turn is formed by bending the plate 19. The plate 19 is hinged to the shank 10 by striking out curved hooks 20 from the shank 10 which engage pintles 21 formed from the material of the plate 19. The part composed of the guard 16, plate 18, and plate 19 constitutes a unit, and this unit may be swung toward and away from the back plate 13. Fig. 2 illustrates the position which this unit may assume. It is normally kept in position for service by means of a spring 22 pivotally mounted at 23 on the shank 10.

The blade is contained in a blade holder 24 which, in effect, is simply sheet metal bent to a U-shaped form with the legs of the U just about far enough apart to lightly squeeze the blade.

The lower leg of this U-shaped blade holder is provided with a slot 25 which serves as a cam for moving the blade holder forwardly in the direction of the stops 17 and 17a and rearwardly therefrom. This motion is effected by means of the cam actuator 26 projecting from the slide 27 thru the slot 34 to be presently described and thru the cam follower slot as is best shown in Fig. 4. The cam slot is not, it will be noticed, parallel with the back edge of the blade holder but, on the contrary, is diagonally arranged with respect to it. The result is that, as the slide 27 is moved in the direction of the arrow A, the movement of the cam actuator causes the blade holder and of course any blade contained in it to be retracted from the stops and ultimately to take the position shown in Fig. 4. By moving the slide in the direction of the arrow B, the blade holder is caused to move toward the stops, and consequently the edges of any blade contained in the holder will ultimately contact with the stops. While, as the blade holder moves toward the stops, one end of the blade may at times be in advance of the other, nevertheless the advancing end will be arrested by contact with its stop, and the other end will then move forward until it, in turn, contacts with its stop. Proper alignment of the edge of the blade with the guard as determined by the stops is therefore always assured. Again, in case the blade should not be fully seated in the carrier, the arresting of the two ends of the blade edge and continued movement of the cam will cause any such misadjustment to be remedied.

The slide is kept in proper alignment by means of guide 28 struck out from the material of the shank 10, and also by the presence of the cam 26 in the slot 34. Obviously, the blade holder may be worked backward and forward by moving the slide 27 in and out, which may be conveniently done by manipulating the finger piece 29 on the slide.

However, for the purposes of removing a worn blade and injecting a new one, it is desirable to use the blade magazine 30 provided with the aligning finger 31. The essential features of the blade magazine alone are already well known in the art—e. g., in the Rodrigues U. S. Patent No. 2,109,017, above referred to. In brief, it consists of a receptacle for retaining a pack of blades, a slide 32 for ejecting the blades one by one through an orifice at the end of the magazine, the above-mentioned aligning finger 31 for inserting in an aligning slot defined by the struck-out guide 28, and the plate 33. The latter rests against the back plate 13 and is provided with a slot 34 parallel with the back plate 13 and through which the cam actuator 26 passes to enter the cam follower slot 25. The plate 33 may be attached to the back plate 13 by soldering or other convenient method and the turned over portion 33a forms a support on which the blade holder may slide forward and backward toward and away from the stops 17 and 17a at the same time being confined between it and the flange 15.

It will be seen that, when the locking spring 22 is turned anti-clockwise (as viewed in Fig. 1), the guard 16 may be dropped to the position shown in Fig. 2, and the exposed blade is then available for cleaning by a stream of water, wiping, or otherwise.

In operating the razor, let it be assumed that the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 1—i. e., in shaving position with a blade in the blade holder abutting the stops. The magazine finger is then inserted between the guide 28 and plate 33 and pushed in as far as it will go, forcing out the slide in the direction of the arrow A to the position shown in Figure 2. It is also to be assumed that the parts are so proportioned, constructed, and dimensioned that the blade ejecting orifice of the magazine is properly aligned with the blade holder (which latter is in the position shown in Fig. 4) to cause an ejected blade to enter the blade holder properly seated in the latter. The worn blade in the holder having been ejected and the new blade inserted in its place, the magazine aligning finger is then withdrawn. It is to be noticed that in process of injecting a new blade, the edge of this blade amply clears the stops 17 and 17a so that the edge is not damaged.

It then remains to bring the blade edge in abutment with the stops, which is effected by manually forcing the slide 27 in the direction of the arrow B until such abutment takes place. The implement is then ready for shaving.

Regarding the cam slot, it is best that abutment of the blade edge with the stops take place before the cam actuator 26 has traveled the full length of the cam follower slot. For example, Fig. 5 would illustrate an approximately desirable position for the cam actuator with relation to the cam slot when the blade is in full abutment. At this point the slide is still capable of further travel through the distance indicated by the numeral 35 except as such further travel is prevented by the abutment of the blade edge with the stops. The purpose of this is to allow tolerance for plus and minus dimensions of parts, wear of the blade stops, and like inaccuracies.

While we have described a certain particular construction in which our invention is incorporated, we do not desire to be limited to this particular embodiment since many changes and modifications may easily be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A razor comprising a blade holder, a platform on which the holder is slidably supported, stops for arresting the motion of the blade holder by contact with the edge of the blade carried by the blade holder, the blade holder being provided with a cam slot arranged diagonally with respect to the edge of the blade holder, and a slide provided with a cam actuator having operative engagement with the slot, the slide being mounted for motion parallel with the line connecting the stops.

2. A razor comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a back plate, the three forming a channel for the retention of a blade holder slidably mounted therein, a guard provided with stops for arresting the movement of the blade holder by contact with the edge of a blade carried thereby, the blade holder being provided with a cam slot arranged diagonally with respect to a line connecting the stops, and a slide mounted for motion parallel to said line and provided with a cam actuator having operative connection with the cam slot.

3. A razor comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a back plate, the three forming a channel for the retention of a blade holder slidably mounted therein, a guard provided with stops for arresting the movement of the blade holder by contact with the edge of a blade carried thereby, the blade holder being provided with a cam slot arranged diagonally with respect to a line connecting the stops, and a slide mounted for motion parallel to the said line and provided with a cam actuator having operative connection with the slot.

4. A shaving head for a razor, said shaving head being provided with a channel for the retention of a blade holder slidably mounted therein, a guard hingedly connected to the head, stops on the guard for arresting movement of the blade holder in the direction of the guard to contact with the edge of a blade carried thereby, the blade holder being provided with a cam adapted by co-action with a cam actuator to advance the blade holder toward and retract it from the stops, and a cam actuator having operative connection with said cam and adapted to effect such advancement and retraction.

5. A shaving head for a razor comprising a platform, a hingedly mounted guard, a slidably mounted blade holder provided with a cam, and a cam actuator adapted to operate on the cam to advance the blade holder toward and retract it from the guard.

John H. Hilliard.

Leopold Kuhnl.