zoom_in
HomeHelp
zoom_out
parts 11 34 19 20 61 24 13 17 12 32 26 25 23 55 56 54 47 51 44 50 16 43 36 57 14 10 Fig1 Fig1 11 17 12 32 23 29 30 48 32 25 23 18 31 56 34 30 24 55 51 54 13 24 43 57 10 Fig2 Fig2 11 17 50 13 19 15 10 Fig3 Fig3 12 42 18 Fig4 Fig4 12 62 21 22 Fig5 Fig5 11 19 23 13 16 50 38 20 25 34 49 17 33 40 41 12 27 32 26 29 39 55 56 24 52 47 54 44 45 46 36 53 59 14 58 43 15 57 10 Fig6 Fig6 40 11 19 25 20 24 13 39 38 17 12 41 18 32 27 26 29 55 34 16 54 56 49 50 52 59 14 36 15 47 43 57 58 45 44 51 46 53 10 Fig7 Fig7 11 19 20 34 16 50 54 24 13 25 38 49 17 33 41 12 18 32 27 26 29 39 55 56 47 43 57 49 52 59 14 58 45 44 51 46 53 36 15 10 Fig8 Fig8 18 42 41 12 17 41 11 33 26 13 32 25 39 61 27 28 29 30 55 40 60 38 34 48 40 56 30 32 31 61 19 20 23 50 46 49 24 15 37 37 36 59 35 36 51 52 54 53 43 57 58 45 44 47 Fig9 Fig9 11 13 19 17 33 41 Fig10 Fig10

Injector Razor with Hydromagic Lever

PatentUS2911714

InventionSafety razor with blade locking means for receiving blades from a magazine

FiledMonday, 26th April 1954

PublishedTuesday, 10th November 1959

InventorsLeopold Karl Kuhnl, Carl George Preis

OwnerEversharp Inc.

LanguageEnglish

It's quite an effort to understand in detail how the Hydromagic lever works, but it's interesting to see how clever it is.

For a full resolution version of the images click here

A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office
2,911,714 Patented Nov. 10, 1959

2,911,714 SAFETY RAZOR WITH BLADE LOCKING MEANS FOR RECEIVING BLADES FROM A MAGAZINE Carl G. Preis, Forest Hills, N.Y., and Leopold Karl Kuhnl, Stratford, Conn., assignors to Eversharp, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Application April 26, 1954, Serial No. 425,618 16 Claims. (Cl. 30—64)

This invention has to do with safety razors of the same general type as that disclosed in Rodrigues Patent No. 1,969,945, wherein a new blade is adapted to be inserted in the head of the razor from a magazine by means of a mechanism which pushes in the new blade and at the same time ejects the used blade.

When it is desired to wash the lather and hair particles from the blade of a razor of this type either during or between shaves difficulty is usually experienced in clearing the blade because of the close fit of the blade in the head of the razor between the cap and the seat, and if the blade is removed by hand from the head it is not only dangerous to handle but difficult if not impossible to replace.

One object of the present invention is to provide an improved razor of the type referred to in which the blade can be quickly and easily rendered accessible for washing either during or between shaves while remaining locked with respect to the head of the razor, which added feature will not interfere in any way with the insertion of a new blade or the ejection of the used one by means of the usual blade-changing mechanism.

Another object of the invention is to provide a safety razor of the type referred to which is of new and improved construction.

While the foregoing statements are indicative in a general way of the nature of the invention, other more specific objects and advantages will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon a full understanding of the construction and operation of the novel means provided for rendering the blade accessible for washing.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is presented herein by way of exemplification but it will of course be appreciated that the invention is susceptible of incorporation in other structurally modified forms coming equally within the scope of the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side view of a razor constructed in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a front view of the razor;

Fig. 3 is a rear view of the same;

Fig. 4 is a top view of a blade suitable for use in the razor;

Fig. 5 is a side view of a blade magazine suitable for use in inserting new blades into the razor;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view through the razor in its closed blade clamping position;

Fig. 7 is a similar view through the razor in its open blade washing position;

Fig. 8 is a similar view through the razor in its partially closed position;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the various parts which make up the head of the razor; and

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view through the cap of the razor.

As will be observed in the drawings, the new razor includes a handle 10 of suitable form and a head 11 in which a blade 12 is adapted to be positioned for shaving.

The head 11 of the razor includes a substantially rigid main frame 13. The lower portion of the frame 13 extends downwardly into a complementary slot 14 in the upper end of the handle 10, where it is fixedly secured to the handle by a rivet 15, while the upper portion of the frame 13 is curved forwardly at 16 and terminates in a narrow forwardly and downwardly projecting flange 17, which flange constitutes the cap or cover against which the blade 12 is adapted to be clamped. The cap 17 covers the rear portion only of the blade 12, leaving the cutting edge 18 of the blade exposed.

Immediately beneath and behind the cap 17 the frame 13 is provided with a flat section19, which section forms the rear stationary wall of an expansible channel 20 in which the positioning key 21 of the usual blade magazine 22 is adapted to be inserted. The bottom of the channel 20 is formed by two forwardly turned ears 23 at the ends of the section 19. Below the section 19 the frame 13 is abruptly reduced in width and tapers downwardly into the handle 10. The side edges of the tapered portion of the frame 13 are provided with narrow forwardly turned edge flanges 24, which flanges are beveled off at their upper ends.

In front of the frame 13 the head 11 of the razor is provided with a forwardly and downwardly shiftable plate 25 of generally L-shaped cross section. The upper portion of the plate 25 consists of a flat forwardly projecting flange 26, which flange underlies the cap 17 on the frame 13 and constitutes the seat for the blade 12. The seat 26 terminates at its front edge in a downwardly curved longitudinally serrated formation 27, which formation constitutes the guard rail for the blade on the seat. Behind the guard rail 27 the seat 26 is provided with a clearance opening 28.

Immediately beneath and behind the seat 26 the plate 25 is provided with a flat section 29, which section is disposed in forwardly spaced relation to the flat section 19 of the frame and forms the front forwardly shiftable wall of the expansible channel 20 for the key 21 of the blade magazine. Below the flat section 29 the plate 25 terminates in two laterally spaced downwardly tapering end portions 30 (see Fig. 2), which portions are located between the upper ends of the edge flanges 24 on the correspondingly tapered portion of the frame 13. Above and outwardly of the end portions 30 the ends of the flat section 29 of the plate 25 present downwardly facing shoulders 31 (see Fig. 2), which shoulders overlie the beveled upper ends of the edge flanges 24 on the frame 13 when the razor is in its closed position, which is the position shown in Fig. 6.

The blade seat 26 on the plate 25 is provided adjacent its ends with small upwardly projecting stops 32, which stops are adapted to engage with the front edge of the blade 12 close to the ends of the latter. The blade 12, when clamped in shaving position between the cap 17 and the seat 26, is accurately positioned relative to the guard rail 27 on the seat 26 by the stops 32, which stops press the blade rearwardly against a small centrally located forwardly projecting boss 33 on the frame 13 at the rear edge of the underside of the cap 17. The seat 26, which normally assumes the blade clamping position shown in Fig. 6, is shiftable downwardly and forwardly from that position into the position shown in Fig. 7.

The seat 26 is resiliently held in its blade clamping position by a main spring 34 which is located in front of the frame 13. The plate 25, which carries the seat 26, is loosely mounted on the upper end of the spring 34, and the upper end of the spring 34 is movable, with the plate 25, toward and away from the flat section 19 of the frame 13. When the spring 34 is moved toward the frame it acts to close the head of the razor and clamp the seat 26 upwardly and rearwardly against the cap17 on the interposed blade 12, as shown in Fig. 6, whereas when the spring 34 is moved away from the frame it acts to open the head of the razor and permit the seat 26 to drop downwardly and forwardly, as shown in Fig. 7.

The lower portion 35 of the spring 34 tapers downwardly like the lower portion of the frame 13 and fits between the inturned edge flanges 24 on the frame in a position just below that assumed by the laterally spaced lower end portions 30 of the plate 25. The spring 34 is hingedly connected with the frame 13 by small trunnions 36 on the lower end of the spring, which trunnions pass through bearing apertures 37 provided in the edge flanges 24 on the frame. This hinge connection permits the upper portion 38 of the spring 34 to move bodily toward and away from the frame 13.

The upper portion 38 of the spring 34 is abruptly reduced in width just below the lower edges of the end portions 30 of the plate 25 and extends upwardly through a narrow laterally elongated slot 39 in the rear portion of the seat 26. At its upper end the upper portion 38 of the spring terminates in two small laterally spaced upwardly projecting prongs 40, which prongs track within shallow grooves 41 in the underside of the cap 17 when the upper portion 38 of the spring 34 is in its forward position, which is the position shown in Fig. 7. When the upper portion 38 of the spring 34 is moved rearwardly, however, from the position shown in Fig. 7 to that shown in Fig. 6, the prongs 40 on the upper portion of the spring will retract from the underside of the cap 17 a distance somewhat greater than the thickness of the blade 12. The blade 12 is provided with laterally spaced holes 42, which are slightly larger than the prongs 40, and the prongs 40 extend through the holes 42 in loosely but securely interlocked engagement with the blade when the spring is in its forward position.

The head 11 of the razor is opened and closed by means of a small lever 43 which is conveniently located at the front of the razor just below the head. When the lever 43 is flipped up, from the vertical position shown in Fig. 6 to the horizontal position shown in Fig. 7, the head 11 will open, and when the lever 43 is pressed down again, into the position shown in Fig. 6, the head 11 will close.

The lever 43, which will be referred to as the lift lever, is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on the free end of a second underlying lever 44, by means of a pin 45, and this second lever 44, which will be referred to as the compression lever, is pivotally mounted at its other end on the front end of a forwardly projecting stud 46, by means of a pin 47. The stud 46 passes through the lower end of a vertically elongated slot 48 in the spring 34 at the center of the latter and through a small aperture 49 in the frame 13. The stud 46 is provided at its rear end with a head 50 which engages with the back of the frame 13 and locks the stud against forward movement.

The pivoted end of the compression lever 44 is provided with a cam-shaped nose 51, which nose contacts and operates against the front face of the spring 34. The nose 51 has a flattened low portion 52 and a flattened high portion 53. When the head 11 of the razor is in its open position, as shown in Fig. 7, the spring 34 is permitted by the low portion 52 of the nose to assume its forwardly swung position, whereas when the head 11 is in its closed position, as shown in Fig. 6, the spring 34 is held flexed in its rearwardly swung position by the high portion 53 of the nose, the high portion 53 of the nose first forcing the spring rearwardly and then flexing it in its rearward position.

The rearward movement of the spring 34 by the compression lever 44 serves to move the blade seat 26 rearwardly, while the final movement and flexure of the spring 34 by the compression lever 44 serves to resiliently clamp the seat 26 both upwardly and rearwardly against the overlying cap 17, thereby at the same time clamping the interposed blade between the laterally spaced front stops 32 on the seat and the boss 33 at the back of the cap 17.

The lift lever 43 when pressed down not only operates the underlying compression lever 44 to force the spring 34 toward the frame 13, but during the forepart of its downward movement serves to raise the then lowered seat 26 from the wide open blade locking position shown in Fig. 7 to the raised but still undamped intermediate position shown in Fig. 8. This is accomplished by engagement of the inner end 54 of the lift lever 43 with the lower end of a tongue 55, which tongue extends downwardly from the center of the flat section 29 of the plate 25 on which the seat 26 is mounted and projects downwardly and forwardly at an angle through the previously mentioned slot 48 in the spring 34. The tongue 55 is provided at its lower end with a reversely bent foot 56, which foot is located directly above the inner end 54 of the lift lever 43.

When the head 11 of the razor is in its open blade locking position, as shown in Fig. 7, downward pressure on the then forwardly projecting outer end 57 of the lift lever 43 will rock the lift lever on the then forwardly projecting compression lever 44, from the position shown in Fig. 7 to that shown in Fig. 8. This preliminary movement of the lift lever 43 will bodily lift the tongue 56, and consequently the seat 26, from the position shown in Fig. 7 to one approximating that shown in Fig. 8.

Further downward movement of the outer end 57 of the lift lever 43 will cause the same to bottom at 58 on the outer end of the compression lever 44, after which the compression lever 44 will swing downwardly as a unit with the lift lever, the inner end 54 of the lift lever riding freely out from under the then fully elevated foot 56 on the tongue 55. Continued downward movement of both levers, with the seat 26 raised, will then first move the spring 34 rearwardly and therafter flex it, with the seat 26 properly positioned and clamped against the blade 12 in readiness for shaving. In the closed or shaving position of the head 11, the rearward movement and flexing of the spring 34 during the closing of the head will act to retract the locking prongs 40 from the holes 42 in the blade 12 and move them into a position even with or just below the upper face of the seat 26, as shown in Fig. 6, the withdrawal of the prongs being due in part to the angular disposition of the cap 17 relative to the pivotal axis 36 of the spring 34 and also in part to the shortening of the spring 34 resulting from its flexure.

When the lift lever 43 is flipped up and moves from the position shown in Fig. 6 to that shown in Fig. 7, the spring 34 will unflex and swing forwardly, causing the prongs 40 to be projected into the holes 42 in the blade 12. At the same time, the forward movement of the spring 34 will release the plate 25 on which the seat 26 is mounted and will permit the seat to drop down into the position shown in Fig. 7, leaving the blade loosely but securely locked on the prongs 40, in which position the blade can be easily and thoroughly washed on both sides by holding the opened head 11 under a stream of water. To insure the spring 34 moving forwardly as far as it will go into a position wherein the prongs 40 reach the forward ends of the grooves 41 in the underside of the cap 17, a light bowed leaf spring 59 is preferably positioned between the main spring 34 and the frame 13, astraddle the stud 46. In the closed position of the razor this small spring 59 is collapsed flatly between the main spring 34 and the frame 13, as shown in Fig6.

When the seat 26 drops down into the position shown in Fig. 7 the rear portion of the blade 12 will be held in an elevated position relative to the rear portion of the seat by reason of its engagement with the horizontal up per edge 60 of the spring 34.

After the head 11 of the razor has been closed the prongs 40 will no longer interlock with the holes 42 in the blade 12 and the blade can be changed in the usual manner, by inserting the key 21 of the magazine 22 in the channel 20.

When the key 21 is inserted in the channel 20 it will act to pry the front wall 29 of the channel forwardly against the resistance offered by the main spring 34, thereby moving the seat 26 forwardly far enough to withdraw the stops 32 from engagement with the front edge of the blade. With the seat 26 in its forward position, a new blade can be fed endwise from the magazine 22 between the cap 17 and the seat 26, which new blade will at the same time push the used blade out.

The end of the plate 25 against which the magazine 22 is pressed is provided with a downwardly and outwardly inclined wing portion 61 for camming coaction with the usual embossment 62 on the key 21 of the magazine, and the other end of the plate 25 is also provided with a similar wing portion. These two wing portions 61 assist in guiding the plate 25 in its movement between the positions shown in Figs. 6 and 7.

The locking holes 42 in the blade 12 have nothing to do with the registration which is effected between the front edge of the blade and the guard rail 27, this being done entirely by the front stops 32 and the rear boss 33. The holes 42 are so located in the blade as to become hooked on the moving prongs 40 as the latter travel upwardly and forwardly relative to the cap 17, and the holes 42 are therefore somewhat larger in size than the prongs 40.

We claim:

1. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a blade cap and a blade seat between which a blade is adapted to be fed from the magazine and clamped in position for shaving, means for separating the cap and seat to unclamp the blade to permit a limited movement thereof between the cap and seat and for bringing the cap and seat together again to reclamp the blade, and means for loosely engaging the blade to lock the same against removal when the cap and seat are separated and for releasing the blade when the cap and seat are brought together again.

2. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a blade cap and a blade seat between which a blade is adapted to be fed from the magazine and clamped in position for shaving, manually operable means for separating the cap and seat to unclamp the blade to permit a limited movement thereof between the cap and seat and for bringing the cap and seat together again to reclamp the blade, and means operated automatically by said manually operable means for loosely engaging the blade to lock the same against removal when the cap and seat are separated and for releasing the blade when the cap and seat are brought together again.

3. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a blade cap and a blade seat between which a blade is adapted to be fed from the magazine and clamped in position for shaving, manually operable means for separating the cap and seat to unclamp the blade to permit a limited movement thereof between the cap and seat and for bringing the cap and seat together again to reclamp the blade, and means operated automatically by said manually operable means for loosely engaging the blade to lock the same against removal when the cap and seat are separated and for releasing the blade when the cap and seat are brought together again, said locking means consisting of one or more prongs which, when the cap and seat are separated, project into one or more holes provided for the same in the blade.

4. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a blade cap and a blade seat between which a blade is adapted to be fed from the magazine and clamped in position for shaving, manually operable means for separating the cap and seat to unclamp the blade to permit a limited movement thereof between the cap and seat and for bringing the cap and seat together again to reclamp the blade, and means operated automatically by said manually operable means for loosely engaging the blade to lock the same against removal when the cap and seat are separated and for releasing the blade when the cap and seat are brought together again, said locking means consisting of one or more prongs which, when the cap and seat are separated, project upwardly through the seat into one or more holes provided for the same in the blade.

5. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a frame which is provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting cap, a retractable seat below the cap, which seat in its raised position is adapted to support a blade and clamp the same against the underside of the cap, and which seat in its lowered position is adapted to support the blade without clamping the same, a seat-supporting member connected with the seat for clamping the same against the cap on an interposed blade, which member is also connected with the frame for movement toward the same to clamp the seat and for movement away from the frame to unclamp the seat, blade-locking means associated with said seat-supporting member, said means being adapted to move into engagement with a blade on the seat to lock the blade loosely between the seat and the cap when said member is moved away from the frame and being adapted to move out of engagement with the blade to unlock the same when said member is moved toward the frame, and manually operable means for moving the member toward the frame and for securing it in that position.

6. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a frame which is provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting cap, a retractable seat below the cap, which seat in its raised position is adapted to support a blade and clamp the same against the underside of the cap, and which seat in its lowered position is adapted to support the blade without clamping the same, a seat-supporting member connected with the seat for clamping the same against the cap on an interposed blade, which member is also connected with the frame for movement toward the same to clamp the seat and for movement away from the frame to unclamp the seat, blade-locking means associated with said seat-supporting member, said means being adapted to move into engagement with a blade on the seat to lock the blade loosely between the seat and the cap when said member is moved away from the frame and being adapted to move out of engagement with the blade to unlock the same when said member is moved toward the frame, said member including a spring portion which when moved toward the frame flexes to clamp the seat resiliently against the cap on an interposed blade, and manually operable means for moving the member toward the frame and for securing it in that position.

7. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a frame which is provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting cap, a retractable seat below the cap, which seat in its raised position is adapted to support a blade and clamp the same against the underside of the cap, and which seat in its lowered position is adapted to support the blade without clamping the same, a seat-supporting member connected with the seat for clamping the same against the cap on an interposed blade, which member is also connected with the frame for movement toward the same to clamp the seat and for movement away from the frame to unclamp the seat, blade-locking means associated with said seat-supporting member, said means being adapted to move into engagement with a blade on the seat to lock the blade loosely between the seat and the cap when said member is moved away from the frame and being adapted to move out of engagement with the blade to unlock the same when said member is moved toward the frame, said member including a spring portion which when moved toward the frame flexes to clamp the seat resiliently against the cap on an interposed blade, manually operable means for moving the member toward the frame and for securing it in that position, and spring means for moving said member away from the frame after it has been released.

8. In a safety razor, a forwardly projecting blade cap, a blade seat beneath the cap adapted to clamp a blade against the underside of the cap in position for shaving, means for moving the seat upwardly toward the cap, other means for moving the seat rearwardly under the cap, and a single manually manipulatable member for operating both of said means, one after the other, which member when actuated operates first the means for moving the seat upwardly until the seat has reached its uppermost position and then the means for moving the seat rearwardly until the then fully raised seat has reached its rearmost position.

9. In a safety razor, a forwardly projecting blade cap, a blade seat beneath the cap adapted to clamp a blade against the underside of the cap in position for shaving, a lift lever for raising the seat upwardly toward the cap, and a separate cam lever for pressing the raised seat rearwardly under the cap, said lift lever pivotally mounted on said cam lever and provided with an extension in the form of a finger piece, which finger piece when actuated will first move the lift lever to raise the seat upwardly toward the cap and will then move the cam lever to press the raised seat rearwardly under the cap.

10. In a safety razor, a frame which is provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting cap and at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges, a movable seat beneath the cap for supporting a blade between the seat and the cap, which seat is provided adjacent its rear edge with a downwardly extending portion which is disposed in front of the frame, and a spring having a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end for resiliently urging the seat toward the cap, which spring bears adjacent its said upper end against the downwardly extending portion of the seat, is secured adjacent its lower end with the frame, and has an intermediate downwardly tapering portion in front of the frame below the downwardly extending portion of the seat, which downwardly tapering portion of the spring is nested between and confined laterally by the side flanges of the frame.

11. In a safety razor, a frame which is provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting cap and at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges, a movable seat beneath the cap for supporting a blade between the seat and the cap, which seat is provided adjacent its rear edge with a downwardly extending portion which is disposed in front of the frame and terminates between the upper extremities of the side flanges of the frame, and a spring having a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end for resiliently urging the seat toward the cap, which spring bears adjacent its said upper end against the downwardly extending portion of the seat, is secured adjacent its lower end with the frame, and has an intermediate downwardly tapering portion in front of the frame below the downwardly extending portion of the seat, which downwardly tapering portion of the spring is nested between and confined laterally by the side flanges of the frame.

12. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a handle which is provided with an upwardly opening slot, a frame which projects upwardly from the upper end of the handle with its lower end secured within the slot, said frame provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting blade cap, and provided at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges, a movable seat beneath the cap for supporting a blade between the seat and the cap, which seat is provided adjacent its rear edge with a downwardly extending portion in front of the frame, and an upstanding spring in front of the frame having a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end which bears against the downwardly extending portion of the seat for resiliently urging the seat into blade clamping association with the cap, said spring provided with a downwardly tapering portion intermediate its upper and lower ends, which portion is of substantially the same shape and size as the portion of the frame directly behind the same and which portion is nested between the side flanges of the frame.

13. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a handle which is provided with an upwardly opening slot, a frame which projects upwardly from the upper end of the handle with its lower end secured within the slot, said frame provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting blade cap, and provided at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges, of substantially uniform width, which flanges continue downwardly below the top of the handle into engagement with the opposite sides of the latter, a movable seat beneath the cap for supporting a blade between the seat and the cap, which seat is provided adjacent its rear edge with a downwardly extending portion in front of the frame and an upstanding spring in front of the frame having a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end which bears against the downwardly extending portion of the seat for resiliently urging the seat into blade clamping association with the cap, said spring provided with a downwardly tapering portion intermediate its upper and lower ends, which portion is of substantially the same shape and size as the portion of the frame directly behind the same and which portion is nested between the side flanges of the frame.

14. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a handle which is provided with an upwardly opening slot, a frame which projects upwardly from the upper end of the handle with its lower end secured within the slot, said frame provided at its upper end with a forwardly projecting blade cap, and provided at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges a movable seat beneath the cap for supporting a blade between the seat and the cap, which seat is provided adjacent its rear edge with a downwardly extending portion in front of the frame, and an upstanding spring in front of the frame having a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end of reduced width which bears against the downwardly extending portion of the seat for resiliently urging the seat into blade clamping association with the cap, said spring having its lower end positioned in the slot in:the handle in front of and in engagement with the frame and provided below the lower edge of the downwardly extending portion of the seat with a relatively wide downwardly tapering portion, which portion is of substantially the same shape and size as the portion of the frame directly behind the same and which portion is nested between the side flanges of the frame.

15. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a handle; a frame which projects upwardly from the upper end of the handle and is provided with a laterally elongated forwardly projecting cap at its upper end, with a correspondingly elongated downwardly extending portion beneath the rear edge of the cap, and with another downwardly extending portion of reduced width beneath the center of the laterally elongated downwardly extending portion, which reduced portion tapers downwardly in width; a laterally elongated forwardly projecting seat movably positioned beneath the cap, which seat is provided at its rear edge with a correspondingly elongated downwardly extending portion in front of the laterally elongated downwardly extending portion of the frame, which downwardly extending portion of the seat is notched upwardly intermediate its ends to a point short of the seat; and an upstanding spring in front of the frame, which spring is connected at its lower end to the frame and is provided with a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end which partially nests within the notching in the downwardly extending portion of the seat in upwardly lapped bearing association with the front of said downwardly extending portion at a point adjacent the upper edge of the notching for resiliently urging the seat into blade clamping association with the cap.

16. In a safety razor of the type in which new blades are adapted to be fed to the same from a magazine, a handle; a frame which projects upwardly from the upper end of the handle and is provided with a laterally elongated forwardly projecting cap at its upper end, with a correspondingly elongated downwardly extending portion beneath the rear edge of the cap, and with another downwardly extending portion of reduced width beneath the center of the laterally elongated downwardly extending portion, which reduced portion tapers downwardly in width and is provided at its sides with forwardly projecting downwardly converging side flanges, which flanges merge at their lower ends with the sides of the handle; a laterally elongated forwardly projecting seat movably positioned beneath the cap, which seat is provided at its rear edge with a correspondingly elongated downwardly extending portion in front of the laterally elongated downwardly extending portion of the frame, which downwardly extending portion of the seat is notched upwardly intermediate its ends to a point short of the seat; and an upstanding spring in front of the frame, which spring is connected at its lower end to the frame and is provided with a forwardly and rearwardly movable upper end of abruptly reduced width which partially nests within the notching in the downwardly extending portion of the seat in upwardly lapped bearing association with the front of said downwardly extending portion at a point adjacent the upper edge of the notching for resiliently urging the seat into blade clamping association with the cap; said spring provided intermediate its upper and lower ends with a relatively wide downwardly tapering portion which is positioned immediately beneath the lower edge of the downwardly extending portion of the seat, is of substantially the same shape and size as the portion of the frame directly behind the same, and is nested between the side flanges of the frame.