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parts g A g B l c' c s a' a s l c' 2-2 2-2 2-2 Fig1 Fig1 g A h H l c a' s B c' Fig2 Fig2 c' l s a a' s l c' A c a3 h a2 w c a3 g g Fig3 Fig3

Fox, A.B.C, Challenge, Holborn, Le Petit, Nutshell Razor

PatentUS632025

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledWednesday, 24th May 1899

PublishedTuesday, 29th August 1899

InventorEgon Lothar Schmitz

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

No. 632,025.Patented Aug. 29, 1899.
United States Patent Office.

Egon Lothar Schmitz, of New York, N.Y. Safety-Razor.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 632,025, dated August 29, 1899. Application filed May 24, 1899. Serial No. 718,011. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Egon Lothar Schmitz, a subject of the Emperor of Germany, and a resident of New York, borough of Manhattan, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has reference to improvements in safety-razors; and it is the special object of my invention to provide a novel, improved, and very simple safety-razor in which the hinged frame-box and principal adjusting-screw with supporting-flange heretofore employed are entirely dispensed with.

It is further the object of my invention to produce a safety-razor with a frame so simple that the complete apparatus may be packed in so small a box that it can be carried conveniently in a vest-pocket, thus enabling one to carry it always conveniently about his person without occupying room to any appreciable effect.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which—

Figure 1 represents, on an enlarged scale, a safety-razor in top plan view with blade inserted. Fig. 2 is a cross-section, on same enlarged scale, on line 2 2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the frame, representing same in about natural size.

Similar letters of reference denote like parts in all the figures.

My improved safety-razor consists, essentially, of a simple frame, which is practically flat, a razor-blade, and a short handle.

The frame A actually consists of a blade-support, preferably stenciled out, forming then a top portion a, whose upper part is bent rectangularly forward, whereby a top proper, a′, is formed. Below the top proper the top portion forms a narrow bar-like strip a2, (see Fig. 3,) extending at the ends vertically down, and is provided on the outside of these extensions a3 with small lugs l, integral therewith. The two side branches a3 extend below into a comb-like blade-guard g, which is formed throughout the entire width of the frame. The blade-guard g and the top portion a2 are united in the center by a web w, containing a circular opening, into which fits a hub h, which is provided with a female screw. The single branches of the comb-like guard are bent somewhat backward in the usual manner, as is seen in Fig. 2.

The lugs l on the sides prevent the blade B from moving sidewise; but in order to completely secure the blade when it is placed on the frame two blade-retaining clamps c are pivoted in the top end corners of the frame. These pivots enable the clamps to swing down. The clamps are provided on their lower ends with a flange c′, which is bent up rectangularly and again rectangularly in, so that the top portion c′ of the flange extends over the clamp and is parallel therewith. The top proper, a′, is provided near its ends with two openings forming each a female screw, through which pass the blade-adjusting screws s.

The handle H, Fig. 2, employed with this razor is short, so that it fits into the small box containing the safety-razor. It tapers gradually toward its front and is usually made hollow, so as to weigh relatively little. The front end of the handle is provided with a small male screw, which fits into the female screw of the hub contained in the web. The handle may also be made in form of a telescope-tube.

The whole frame is stenciled in one piece, so that all parts formed thereby are integral with each other, and merely the hub and the clamps are attached thereto. In this manner a very plain and neat frame is produced, which can be manufactured very cheaply.

The razor-blade is inserted and removed in the easiest manner. The blade is simply laid upon the frame between the lugs. Then the clamps are turned down until they rest against the downward branches a3, when the top portion c′ of the clamps will take over the sides of the blade, Figs. 1 and 2, thus securing the blade firmly. In order to adjust properly the cutting edge of the blade in relation to the comb-like guard, the two adjusting set-screws s, above mentioned, are provided. If the blade is property adjusted once, then it may be inserted and removed simply by placing it upon the frame and operating the clamps.

In the described manner a safety-razor is produced having a neat, effective, and very cheap plain frame, which makes it possible to pack the complete safety-razor in so small a box that it can be carried in a vest-pocket.

Having thus described my invention, I claim therein as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent—

1. In a safety-razor, a frame made in one piece and composed of a horizontal narrow top, provided with female screws near its side ends and extending throughout its rear portion rectangularly down forming a bar-like strip, two side branches extending from the bar-like strip vertically down, two small lugs formed outside of these extensions, a comb-like guard formed at the bottom throughout the entire width of the frame, and a web in the center, uniting the top portion and the comb-like guard and having a circular opening in its center, all parts being integral with each other, as specified.

2. In a safety-razor, a frame made in one piece and composed of a horizontal narrow top, provided with female screws near its side ends and extending throughout its rear portion rectangularly down forming a bar-like strip, two side branches extending from the bar-like strip vertically down, two small lugs formed outside of these extensions, a comb-like guard formed at the bottom throughout the entire width of the frame, and a web in the center, uniting the top portion and the comb-like guard and having a circular opening in its center, in combination with two blade-retaining clamps pivoted in the top end corners of the frame, as specified.

3. In a safety-razor, a frame composed of a horizontal top provided with two blade-adjusting set-screws near its side ends and extending throughout its rear portion rectangularly down forming a bar-like strip which extends vertically down into two side branches, two small lugs formed outside of these extensions, a comb-like guard-formed at the bottom throughout the entire width of the frame, a web in the center integral therewith and uniting the bar-like strip with the comb-guard, an opening in the center of the web and a hub in said opening, in combination with a handle screwed into the hub, as specified.

4. In a safety-razor, a frame composed of a horizontal top provided with two blade-adjusting set-screws near its side ends and extending throughout its rear portion rectangularly down forming a bar-like strip which extends vertically down into two side branches, two small lugs formed outside of these extensions, two blade-retaining clamps pivoted in the top and corners of the frame, a comb-like guard formed at the bottom throughout the entire width of the frame, a web in the center integral therewith and uniting the bar-like strip with the comb-guard, an opening in the center of the web and a hub in said opening, in combination with a telescope-handle screwed into the hub, as specified.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

Egon Lothar Schmitz.

Witnesses:

Nicholas Celia,

L. K. Böhne.