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Lather Catcher SE Razor

PatentUS645017

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledThursday, 6th July 1899

PublishedTuesday, 6th March 1900

InventorAugust William Scheuber

OwnerMary Zinn

LanguageEnglish

August Scheuber's first razor patent.

For a full resolution version of the images click here

A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

August Wm. Scheuber, of New York, N.Y., assignor to Mary Zinn, of same place. Safety-Razor
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent 645,017, dated March 6, 1900. Application filed July 6, 1899. Serial No. 722,984. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, August Wm. Scheuber, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York city, borough of Manhattan, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a specification.

By means of this invention the blade of a safety-razor can be accurately adjusted and securely held in proper position for use; and the invention resides in the novel features of construction set forth in the following specification and claims and illustrated in the annexed drawings, in which—

Figure 1 is a sectional side elevation of the razor holding the blade. Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view like Fig. 1, the blade having been released or removed.

The body of the instrument is shown in the form of a shell 1 and is provided with a comb-plate 2, on which the blade is supported. These parts can be jointed or made to open and shut; but this feature need not be described in detail. The comb-plate 2 is shown with the guard 3. The edge of the blade 4 being in proper adjustment or gaged with respect to the guard 3, the device can shave, but is not able to cut the skin. For convenience of description the part of the device under the edge of blade 4 is called the “front.” The blade is engaged by retainers 5, carried by or extended from a yoke-shaped frame composed of a cross-bar 7 and springs 6. These springs are secured at their front parts to comb-plate 2, and the rear ends of these springs are connected by or formed integral with said bar 7. The spring-retainers 5 are made to hold or press the blade to the comb-plate 2, and this pressure also tends to move the blade backward against stop 9, said stop being properly adjusted to prevent the blade being moved back too far. The stop 9 is formed by screws, which can be set or adjusted as required and which form a rigid or non-yielding stop to prevent the blade moving backward or away from the guard. The blade-support has a lug or tap 10 for such screw. A stop 9 being applied at or near each end portion of the back of blade 4, the latter can be adjusted with great nicety.

The spring blade-retainers or rather the bar 7 is shown with a finger-piece 8, enabling the retainer 5 to be moved from and to engaging position. In other words, if the finger-piece is raised to move the retainers 5 away from the comb-plate 2, Fig. 3, the blade 4 is released or can be raised to slide back over the stop 9 or lugs 10 to be removed.

A practical construction is to form the finger-piece 8 or the bar 7 springy or bow-shaped, so that when the finger-piece is raised to releasing position it will spring or seat itself automatically on the edge 11 at the back of the comb-plate 2 and remain raised or lock itself in releasing position for the blade to be removed or replaced. By pushing or pressing the finger-piece 8 off seat 11, Fig. 1, the spring 6 will carry the retainer back to engaging position or toward the comb-plate 2.

The comb-plate 2, as also the stop 9, is rigid or unyielding, and when the spring blade-retainer forces the blade down onto the support and back against the stop said blade will be in fixed position or positive or unyielding adjustment during use. The blade is thus kept positively or uniformly in working position on the guard. The comb-plate 2 is shown with end bars or parts 12 somewhat out of the plane of or bent to higher level than the main portion 2 of this comb-plate.

In practice the springs 6, with retainers 5, bar 7, and finger-piece 8,are all cut or blanked from a single piece of metal and then shaped as required.

What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is—

1. A comb or blade support combined with a spring blade-retainer made to force the blade backward, and a rigid or unyielding stop for limiting the backward motion of the blade substantially as described.

2. A comb or blade support combined with a spring blade-retainer made to force the blade backward, and an adjustable stop or screw made to sit against the blade-back substantially as described.

3. A comb-plate and a spring blade-retainer secured at the front of the plate, combined with lugs at the back of the comb-plate clear of the retainer, and stops in said lugs substantially as described.

4. A comb or blade support combined with a spring blade-retainer and a blade-stop, said retainer having a finger-piece for enabling the retainer to be moved from and to engaging position substantially as described.

5. A blade-support, a spring blade-retainer and a blade-stop, said retainer having a finger-piece for enabling the retainer to be raised to release the blade, said finger-piece when raised being made to spring or rest on the support to remain or automatically lock itself in releasing position substantially as described.

6. A rigid or unyielding blade-support, and a rigid or unyielding back-stop, combined with a spring blade-retainer for forcing a blade down onto the support and back against the stop so that said blade will be in fixed position or positive adjustment during use substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

August Wm. Scheuber.

Witnesses:

W. C. Hauff,

E. F. Kastenhuber.