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parts a b b d f r r i i k h Fig1 Fig1 a b d f h i k Fig2 Fig2 a b d f h i i k r Fig3 Fig3 a b d i f h k r Fig4 Fig4 h f i i h r r Fig5 Fig5 a b d f h i k Fig6 Fig6 a b d f r k h'7 Fig7 Fig7 a b r f h'8 Fig8 Fig8

Lather Catcher SE Razor

PatentUS679639

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledWednesday, 1st May 1901

PublishedTuesday, 30th July 1901

InventorAugust William Scheuber

OwnerMary Zinn

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

August Wm Scheuber, of New York, N. Y., assignor to Mary Zinn, of same place. Safety-Razor
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent 679,639, dated July 30, 1901. Application filed May 1, 1901. Serial No. 53,331 (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, August Wm. Scheuber, a citizen of the United States , residing at Manhattan borough, New York city, in the county and State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a safety-razor; and the invention resides in the novel features of construction set forth in the following specification and claims and illustrated in the annexed drawings, in which—

Figure 1 is a plan view of a razor-casing without a blade. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view like Fig. 1, the blade being in place. Fig. 4 is a side elevation of Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a guard and spring. Fig. 6 is a sectional view of Fig. 4, the casing being opened. Figs. 7 and 8 show modifications.

In the drawings is shown a casing a of a safety-razor, of any suitable shape or design, having a blade-supporting portion or strips b and clips d. A blade having been placed or slipped between the clips and the casing or support and the spring or piece k having been swung or snapped up or into place against the rear of the blade, the latter is moved forward until arrested or wedged between the clips and the support. The edge of the blade moving forward or toward guard f should of course come to rest on the so-called “guard-line”—that is, not so far forward as to be liable to cut the user and not back so far as to miss shaving.

The guard shown is what may be called “automatic” or “self-adjusting,” or, in other words, the blade as it moves into place will move or adjust the movable guard, so that the guard-line comes to the proper position relative to the razor-blade. This guard is shown movable relative to the casing, being connected to slides or carrier h, connected to an adjusting spring or springs i. The latter can be cut or formed in one piece with the spring which forces the blade forward or which acts on spring-piece k; but such details do not affect the scope of the invention. The guard is adjusted by the spring or springs i or moved normally inward or toward the rear or piece k; but as a blade moves into place its edge or front strikes or engages a stop or lugs r on the guard, and as the blade edge moves more or less forward the guard is correspondingly moved. In other words, the arrangement is such that the stops r on the automatic guard secure its proper relative position to the blade—that is to say, the spring connection i between the guard and casing moves the guard inward or causes its stops to strike the blade, or, rather, the edge of the blade, and as the stops contact with the edge the guard-line and edge are made to correspond or rest in proper relative position. Say a blade is wider than ordinary, the edge of such blade will carry the guard farther out or forward, as required, while if the blade is narrow or ground off more or less the guard normally moving inward will bring its stops against the blade to again insure proper relative position. The guard being movable independently of or with respect to the casing and the blade-support the blade can hold the guard more or less forward, as required. By having two springs or spring portions i, each connected to its own side or to opposite sides or ends of the guard, the latter can be arranged to occupy an inclined position, if required—as, for example, if a blade edge should not run exactly straight or true or accurately parallel with the rear edge or heel of the blade or if the blade should sit somewhat inclined on the casing.

Of course the invention is not confined to the exact construction shown, as modifications can be made. In speaking of the guard as being automatically adjustable relative to the blade or to the casing it is evident that the guard can be made movable otherwise than by sliding—as, for example, by swinging or hinging. A spring-hinge h′ arranged to normally swing or move the guard inward, but the spring of which yields to allow the blade to move the guard more or less outward, will automatically effect adjustment or proper relative position of the guard and blade. All variations of this or like nature are included in the invention. In Fig. 7 the spring for the hinge h′ or the guard f is formed by a handle constructed for this purpose, while in Fig. 8 the spring for the hinge h′ is of coiled form slipped about the hinge-pintle.

Such modifications are within the scope of the invention.

As the stops r, located opposite one another or at different ends or sides of the guard, can each engage its respective portion of the blade edge, the guard will be set true with regard to the blade even if the latter or the guard does not sit quite accurately on the casing.

It may be noted that a hinge h′ not only allows automatic adjustment or setting of the guard relatively to the blade, but also allows opening of the case to give access to the interior for cleaning. The guard or the front of the casing being opened or swung out or down access can be had to the interior of the case or the under side of the blade resting in its place. When the front is closed or the guard snapped up or swung or moved to the blade, the spring hinge or pressure will hold or adjust the guard to the edge.

What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is—

1. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support and an automatic or self-adjusting guard substantially as described.

2. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support and a spring actuated or adjusted guard for the blade substantially as described.

3. A safety-razor comprising a blade-support and a blade-adjusted movable guard, substantially as described.

4. A safety-razor comprising a blade-support and a guard adapted to be engaged by the blade to be moved or adjusted thereby substantially as described.

5. A safety-razor comprising a blade-support and a hinged or movable guard set by the blade substantially as described.

6. A safety-razor comprising a blade-support and a guard normally moved inward on the support and adapted for engagement by a blade substantially as described.

7. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support and an automatic or self-adjusting guard movable relatively to or independently of the casing substantially as described.

8. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support, a guard, and a spring connection for uniting the casing and guard substantially as described.

9. A safety-razor casing combined with an automatic or self-setting guard having its opposite portions movable or adjustable independently of one another substantially as described.

10. A safety-razor casing or blade-support and a blade-adjustable guard provided with lugs or stops for securing the proper relative position of the guard to the blade or casing substantially as described.

11. A safety-razor com prising a blade-support and a blade-adjustable guard provided with oppositely-located blade-engaging stops, said guard having its opposite sides independently movable or adjustable so that each end portion of the blade can set its respective portion of the guard substantially as described.

12. A blade-support and a spring-actuated guard made movable or swinging relative to the support substantially as described.

13. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support, and a spring-hinge for allowing the front of the casing to be opened substantially as described.

14. A safety-razor comprising a casing or blade-support, and a guard hinged to the front of the casing so as to open or swing down for giving access to the interior of the casing and to close for carrying the guard to the edge or blade substantially as described.

15. A safety-razor comprising a casing having an opening front and a blade-adjustable guard substantially as described.

16. A safety-razor comprising a casing with a hinged or opening front provided with a guard, said guard having a stop or lugs made to contact with the blade substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

August Wm. Scheuber.

Witnesses:

Chas. E. Poensgen,

E. F. Kastenhuber.