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parts H' H D2 C3 C3 H2 D C C2 F F' G B C' A2 A I Fig1 Fig1 H D2 C3 H2 D E E' H' C3 C G F' F C' C2 B A2 A Fig2 Fig2 I D F F' C2 D' G A' B C' A Fig3 Fig3 C3 C2 F' H H' D C C3 A F I Fig4 Fig4 D E I Fig5 Fig5 D E I Fig6 Fig6

Stropping Machine

PatentUS686549

InventionRazor-Stropping Machine

FiledWednesday, 3rd July 1901

PublishedTuesday, 12th November 1901

InventorAlbert Lyman Silberstein

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

No. 686,549.Patented Nov. 12, 1901.
United States Patent Office.

Albert L. Silberstein, of New York, N.Y. Razor-Stropping Machine.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 686,549, dated November 12, 1901. Application filed July 3, 1901. Serial No. 67,012. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Albert L. Silberstein, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Manhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Razor-Stropping Machine, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

The invention relates to razor-stropping machines for use with separate strops; and the object of the invention is to provide a new and improved razor-stropping machine which will readily accommodate handled razors having blades of different sizes and which is arranged to allow of conveniently placing the razor in position in the holder and securely holding it in place therein, the machine when in use giving the blade the desired inclined position while drawing it over the strop in either direction, so as to present the entire cutting edge of the blade to the strop at each forward and backward movement.

The invention consists of novel features and parts and combinations of the same, as will be fully described hereinafter and then pointed out in the claims.

A practical embodiment of the invention is represented in the accompanying drawings, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a front elevation of the improvement with the parts in a normal central position. Fig. 2 is a like view of the same with the parts in active position and the razor in place in the blade-holder. Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse section of the improvement. Fig. 4 is an end view of the same. Fig. 5 is an enlarged cross-section of the blade-holder with a comparatively thin razor-blade in position therein, and Fig. 6 is a like view of the same with a thick razor-blade in position in the holder.

On the forward end A′ of a handle A is arranged a pivot B, on which is fulcrumed the heel C′ of a cross-bar C2, forming part of the frame C, having parallel arms C3, adapted to rest upon the strop when the machine is used for stropping the razor, as hereinafter more fully described.

The blade-holder D for receiving and securely holding the blade E of the razor is provided at its inner end with a spindle D′, journaled in suitable bearings arranged in the cross-bar C2 of the frame C, and on said blade-holder is secured a pinion F, in mesh with a segmental rack F′, formed or secured on the outer portion of the end A′ of the handle A.

The frame C and the blade-holder D are normally held in a central position, as shown in Fig. 1, by the use of a spring or springs G, coiled on the spindle D′ and connected at one end with the spindle and at the other end with the cross-bar C2 of the frame so that when said frame is swung into an angular position, either to the right or to the left, as indicated in full and dotted lines in Fig. 2 then the spring or springs G are put under tension, and as soon as the frame C is released the pressure of the spring or springs will cause the spindle D′ to rotate, so as to cause the pinion F to roll off on the segmental gear-rack F′ to bring the frame C and the holder D back to the central position shown in Fig. 1. When the holder D is in this central position, its longitudinal opening stands forward to allow of conveniently inserting the blade E into the blade-holder and at the same time hold the cutting edge of the blade away from the strop engaged by the supporting-arms C3 of the frame C.

It is understood that when the arms C3 are in contact with the strop and the operator draws the handle A from right to left then the frame C swings into the inclined position shown in Fig. 2 to cause the edge of the blade E to move in contact with the strop, so that during the movement from the right to the left the blade is honed at one side. On the return stroke—that is, the movement from the left to the right—the frame swings first into the angular position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, and during this movement the pinion F is forced to roll off on the segmental rack F′ to turn the blade-holder D over, so as to bring the other side of the cutting edge of the blade E into contact with the strop. As soon as the arms C3 are lifted off from the strop the spring G immediately causes the frame C and the blade-holder D to swing back to a normal central position, as shown in Fig. 1, so that the cutting edge of the blade extends to the front away from the strop.

In order to limit the swinging movement of the frame C on the pivot B, I provide the handle end A′ with beveled shoulders A2, adapted to be engaged alternately by the flat back of the heel C′, as will be readily understood by reference to Fig. 2. In order to hold the handle E′ of the razor E in proper position during the stropping of the blade, I provide an extension handle-support H, mounted to slide lengthwise on the blade-holder D, the outer end of the handle-support having prongs H′ for receiving and clamping the handle E′ when the latter is extended, as shown in Fig. 2. The inner end H2 of the handle-support H fits exteriorly on the holder D, so as to allow of sliding the handle-support H into an outer extended position or into an inner folded position. The extreme outer ends and sides of the holder D are formed with outwardly-extending stops D2 to limit the outward sliding motion of the end H2 of the handle-support H to prevent the handle-support from being accidentally pulled off of the holder D on sliding the said handle-support into an inclined position.

In order to accommodate razor-blades of different thicknesses in the same holder D, I provide the holder D at the inside with a longitudinally-extending spring I, secured at the outer end to the bottom of the holder and having its free end resting loosely on the said bottom near the inner end of the holder, as is plainly indicated in Fig. 3. Now by sliding the razor-blade into position in the holder its back is moved into contact with the spring I, and the latter consequently forces the blade outward, so as to press its sides into firm contact with the sides of the holder to securely hold the blade in position in the holder, as will be readily understood by reference to Figs. 5 and 6.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent—

1. A razor-stropping machine, comprising a handle, having a fixed segmental rack and inclined shoulders, a frame pivoted on the said handle and having a pair of arms adapted to rest on the strop, the said frame having the flat back of its heel arranged to abut alternately on the said shoulders when the machine is in use, a blade-holder journaled on the frame between the said arms, and a pinion on the spindle of the said blade-holder and in mesh with the said segmental rack, as set forth.

2. A razor-stropping machine, comprising a handle having a fixed segmental rack and inclined shoulders, a frame pivoted on the said handle and having a pair of arms adapted to rest on the strop, the said frame having the flat back of its heel arranged to abut alternately on the said shoulders when the machine is in use, a blade-holder journaled on the frame between the said arms, a pinion on the spindle of the said blade-holder and in mesh with the said segmental rack, and a spring pressing the spindle of the blade-holder for returning the frame and blade-holder to a normal central position, the heel-back then being out of engagement with the said shoulders, as set forth.

3. A razor-stropping machine having a blade-holder provided with means secured to the holder and extending at the inside thereof for engaging the back of the blade inserted into the holder for pressing the blade outwardly and forcing the sides of the blade in firm contact with the sides of the holder, as set forth.

4. A razor-stropping machine having a blade-holder and a spring extending length-wise of the blade-holder along the bottom thereof for engaging and pressing against the back of the blade inserted into the holder, one end of the spring being secured to the blade-holder at the entrance end thereof, as set forth.

5. A razor-stropping machine having a blade-holder for receiving the blade of the razor and a handle-support mounted to slide on the said blade-holder so as to form an extension thereof, as set forth.

6. A razor-stropping machine having a blade-holder for receiving the blade of the razor, a handle-support mounted to slide on the said blade-holder to form an extension thereof, and means for limiting the outward sliding motion of the said handle-support on the said blade-holder, as set forth.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

Albert L. Silberstein.

Witnesses:

Theo. G. Hoster,

Everard B. Marshall.