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parts A a Fig1 Fig1 b' b2 b' B b4 b5 C D 4-4 4-4 4-4 Fig2 Fig2 b' b b2 b2 B 4-4 4-4 4-4 Fig3 Fig3 b3 b3 a Fig4 Fig4

Straight-Style Razor

PatentUS788835

InventionRazor

FiledTuesday, 26th April 1904

PublishedTuesday, 2nd May 1905

InventorFrederick Kampfe

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

No. 788,835.Patented May 5, 1905
United States Patent Office.

Frederick Kampfe, of Brooklyn, New York. Razor
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 788,835, dated May 2, 1905. Application filed April 26, 1904. Serial No. 204,954.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Frederick Kampfe, a citizen of the United States, residing in the borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, city and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Razors, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to razors, and especially to that class where the blade is detachable from the handle and shank.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a blade. Fig. 2 is a side view, partially in section and partially in elevation, of a handle, shank, and blade-holder with the blade in place. Fig. 3 is a back view of the construction shown in Fig. 2, and Fig. 4 a cross-section taken on the line 4 4 of Figs. 2 and 3.

Similar reference-letters designate corresponding parts.

Referring now to the drawings which illustrate the preferred form of my invention, A designates a blade detachable from the blade-holder B, which is preferably rigidly secured to and substantially integral with the shank C, which shank may either be extended to form a handle or may be pivotally connected to a handle D, as shown.

In the back or heel of the blade A is formed a continuous groove a. Preferably this groove will be formed in the back of the blade in the early stages of manufacture thereof, as it can then be used to great advantage in the operations of grinding, polishing, honing, &c.

Preferably, too, the blade will be magnetized, in which event this groove increases the efficiency of the blade as a magnet, makes it easier to magnetize the blade, and conserves the magnetism to a greater extent.

When the blade is made detachable from the blade-holder, as shown in the accompanying drawings, this longitudinal groove has another function—namely, that of coacting with suitable projections arranged on the inside of the blade-holder to hold the blade firmly in position therein. For example, in the construction illustrated in the accompanying drawings the metal forming the back or heel b of the blade-holder B is indented or bent inward to form one or more projections b′. As shown, a number of such projections are formed by the indented metal being slitted or having the portions at b2 cut away, thus leaving a number of projections b′, which coact with the longitudinal groove a in the heel of the blade to hold the same firm.

The sides b3 of the blade-holder are preferably turned up to bear against the sides of the blade A, which further tends to hold the blade rigid.

The slits b2 give additional resiliency to the blade-holder, and the fact that they are formed in the indented portion of the metal prevents the possibility of their edges coming into contact with any surface, such as that of a strop, and this does away with the possibility of scratching such a surface.

The sides b2 of the blade-holder will preferably be cut away at the outer extremities, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, which leaves the back of the blade-holder with its projection or rib extending slightly, so as to form a guide for the inner end of the blade as the same is placed in the holder.

Additional lugs or retaining devices may be provided for the inner end of the blade by forming projections b4 at the inner end of the blade-holder. In this case the portions of the metal of the blade-holder will preferably be cut away, as shown at b5, for the purpose of giving greater resiliency to the spring-lugs b4.

The blade instead of having a rounded back or heel will preferably be cut square, so that the blade will stand on its back, which is a great convenience, especially in the process of washing and wiping, as it does away with the possibility of the blade adhering to the surface upon which it is rested and makes is much easier to handle the same.

What I claim as new is—

1. A razor-blade provided with a continuous longitudinal groove arranged in the back thereof, a blade-holder, and one or more projections arranged within said blade-holder and adapted to coact with the longitudinal groove in said blade.

2. A razor-blade provided with a continuous longitudinal groove arranged in the back thereof, a blade-holder having the metal of its back portion indented to form a projection adapted to coact with the continuous groove in the blade.

3. A razor-blade provided with a continuous longitudinal groove arranged in the back thereof, a blade-holder having the metal of its back portion indented to form a projection adapted to coact with the continuous groove in the blade, said projection being provided with one or more slits.

4. A razor-blade and blade-holder having an indented groove in its back, the bottom wall of the groove having portions removed therefrom to form slits.

In witness whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

Frederick Kampfe.

Witnesses:

H. Adolph Winkopp,

Peter Meyer.