The First Use of the Term “Safety-Razor”

Introduction

For years the wisdom among collectors was that the term “Safety-Razor” was first used by the Kampfe Brothers in their 15th June 1880 patent.

I then stumbled on the definition of “safety razor” by the Merriam-Webster dictionary. They claim the first known use of “safety razor” to be from 1842, but without giving any source for that claim.

This got me interested and I found (among others) the following interesting uses of the term “Safety-Razor”, all predating the 1880 Kampfe patent.

In reverse order…

1878, February 4th - The Age - Melbourne, Australia

Not the first example I found, but interesing in that it refers to Monk's Shaving Apparatus as a safety-razor (and it's from Australia). Monk's razor is definitely what we would call a “Safety-Razor” today.

1842, December 31st - Sheffield And Rotherham Independant, England

This is the article Merriam-Webster refer to by year only. The Oxford English Dictionary does so explicitly (account required).
Early. But not early enough.

The patent number is confusing. According to the British Library web site there was no numbering system for British patents before 1852.
US patent 2891 is actually from December 1842 as well, but is for a door knob.

1833, January 13th - Observer, London, England

The earliest mention of the term “Safety-Razor” I could find for a while is from 1833.

I was then able to improve this date by one more week:

1833, January 5th - The Spectator, London, England

Mechi — of No. 4, Leadenhall Street (Four Doors from Cornhill) — also advertised in The Spectator for the week ending Saturday, January 5, 1833 (page 22) — a week earlier than the previous find.

That's the earliest use of “Safety-Razor” I could find so far. If you can do better, please let me know.